We help young people worldwide identify with STEM

Through connecting them with scientists and engineers online.
To date, the project has run in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Malaysia, Kenya, the USA, Spain, and Vietnam.


We help young people worldwide identify with STEM

Through connecting them with scientists and engineers online.
To date, the project has run in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Malaysia, Kenya, the USA, Spain, and Vietnam.


We help young people worldwide identify with STEM

Through connecting them with scientists and engineers online.
To date, the project has run in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Malaysia, Kenya, the USA, Spain, and Vietnam.


We help young people worldwide identify with STEM

Through connecting them with scientists and engineers online.
To date, the project has run in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Malaysia, Kenya, the USA, Spain, and Vietnam.


We help young people worldwide identify with STEM

Through connecting them with scientists and engineers online.
To date, the project has run in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Malaysia, Kenya, the USA, Spain, and Vietnam.


We help young people worldwide identify with STEM

Through connecting them with scientists and engineers online.
To date, the project has run in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Malaysia, Kenya, the USA, Spain, and Vietnam.


Nearly 80% of UK students value science.
Less than 20% feel it is for them.

Most UK students lack science capital.

Science capital is the term used to describe the things that affect whether a person will feel that science is something for them.

 

We focus on underserved schools

The map shows schools signed up to our projects, highlighting widening participation schools, and schools far from major research universities.
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Students discover that scientists are genuine, real human beings

They begin to realise that science can be something for them.
“I thought scientists just looked like they do in the film Flubber and experimented on aliens or weird stuff but when I found out you liked Taylor Swift I realised you are more down to earth and not like mad scientists :-)”

— Student, November 2015

“The best thing is that they have seen (and were talking afterwards) about how so-and-so likes cats, and that guy is a musicians as well, and so on. Scientists are normal people who like pizza, but are also really into finding things out. Actually quite like the students, really.”

— Teacher

Students attitudes to science improve.

We think we are increasing their science capital.

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Demand exceeds capacity

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